Olivia Grace

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    Things to keep in mind~

    Things to keep in mind~

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    vegansofig:

Bone char is used to filter impurities in sugar and to strip away the brown color. It’s produced using the bones of cows. The bones are bleached in the sun and heated until they become a filter. “Brown sugar” is actually just white sugar that has had coloring and flavoring (molasses) added to it after it already had its natural brown coloring removed. Sugar producers like Domino Foods and C&H will often refer to Bone Char as “natural charcoal.”
Cane sugar is cured using bone char. Beet sugar isn’t. Unfortunately, most of sugar beets in the US and Canada are primarily GMO crop. The majority of commercial fructose on the market is derived from corn or beet source (both of which are fine). FYI: Some companies DO mix beet and cane together.Dextrose is derived from corn as well. Sucrose could be just about anything, so you’ll need to verify with the company. 
Beet, Unrefined, Turbinado, USDA Organic, and Raw are all phrases that let you know bone char was NOT used in your sugar. Same goes for organic cane juice. Agave Nectar, Xylitol (birch sugar), Coconut Palm Sugar, Stevia, Maple Syrup (lard-free), Brown Rice Syrup, Fruit Juice Concentrates, Date Sugar, and Fructose are all VEGAN alternatives to sugar. 
Many countries in Europe, as well as Australia and New Zealand, have banned the use of bone char in the refining process. However, if you purchase foods in any of these countries, it’s essential to make sure that the sugar they contain is actually manufactured locally. To make things even more confusing, not all sugar production plants use bone char. Supermarket brands of sugar (e.g., Giant, Townhouse, etc.) obtain their sugar from several different refineries, making it impossible to know whether it has been filtered with bone char. The sugar issue get’s really tricky when you have to factor in the sugar used in other confectionary products. Again, it all depends on which plant the sugar was obtained from. For those of you that avoid sugar, that’s one less thing to worry about. For anyone with with a sweet tooth, now you’re a savvy sugar shopper! #VegansofIG

    vegansofig:

    Bone char is used to filter impurities in sugar and to strip away the brown color. It’s produced using the bones of cows. The bones are bleached in the sun and heated until they become a filter. “Brown sugar” is actually just white sugar that has had coloring and flavoring (molasses) added to it after it already had its natural brown coloring removed. Sugar producers like Domino Foods and C&H will often refer to Bone Char as “natural charcoal.”

    Cane sugar is cured using bone char. Beet sugar isn’t. Unfortunately, most of sugar beets in the US and Canada are primarily GMO crop. The majority of commercial fructose on the market is derived from corn or beet source (both of which are fine). FYI: Some companies DO mix beet and cane together.Dextrose is derived from corn as well. Sucrose could be just about anything, so you’ll need to verify with the company.

    Beet, Unrefined, Turbinado, USDA Organic, and Raw are all phrases that let you know bone char was NOT used in your sugar. Same goes for organic cane juice. Agave Nectar, Xylitol (birch sugar), Coconut Palm Sugar, Stevia, Maple Syrup (lard-free), Brown Rice Syrup, Fruit Juice Concentrates, Date Sugar, and Fructose are all VEGAN alternatives to sugar. 

    Many countries in Europe, as well as Australia and New Zealand, have banned the use of bone char in the refining process. However, if you purchase foods in any of these countries, it’s essential to make sure that the sugar they contain is actually manufactured locally.

    To make things even more confusing, not all sugar production plants use bone char. Supermarket brands of sugar (e.g., Giant, Townhouse, etc.) obtain their sugar from several different refineries, making it impossible to know whether it has been filtered with bone char. The sugar issue get’s really tricky when you have to factor in the sugar used in other confectionary products. Again, it all depends on which plant the sugar was obtained from. For those of you that avoid sugar, that’s one less thing to worry about. For anyone with with a sweet tooth, now you’re a savvy sugar shopper! #VegansofIG


    vegansofig:

VEAL is a by-product of the dairy industry. For female cows to produce milk, they are kept in a constant cycle of being pregnant and giving birth.
All forms of dairy farming involve forcibly impregnating cows. This involves a person inserting his/her arm far into the cow’s rectum in order to position the uterus, and then forcing an instrument into her vagina.The restraining apparatus used is commonly called a “rape rack.” 
If given the opportunity, a dairy cow and her calf would remain companions for life. The forced separation on factory farms causes cows and calves an incredible amount of pain and grief. 
Once separated, the cows are then hooked up to milking machines, enslaved to produce milk for humans that was intended for their baby that was ripped away. And when they stop lactating, they’re impregnated again. The same vicious cycle continues until the cows can no longer produce milk. When they’re all dried up they’re sent to slaughter. 
Male calves are useless for milk production. Dairy cows are a different breed of cattle from the ones raised for beef. Dairy cows, female and male, lack the musculature necessary to maximize profits for beef producers. About half of the female calves will become dairy cows, to replace their mothers. The other half of the females are useless to the dairy industry. Nearly all of the male calves and half of the female calves are taken from their mothers, to be turned into veal. 
Calves raised for veal are forced to spend their short lives in individual crates that are no more than 30 inches wide and 72 inches long. These crates are designed to prohibit exercise and normal muscle growth in order to produce tender “gourmet” veal. The calves are fed a milk substitute that is purposely low in iron so that they will become anemic and their flesh will stay pale. After four months “living” in these conditions, they’re sent to the slaughterhouse. 
It’s sad to think that this heinous industry is thriving because of society’s mass consumption of dairy products. #VegansofIG

    vegansofig:

    VEAL is a by-product of the dairy industry. For female cows to produce milk, they are kept in a constant cycle of being pregnant and giving birth.

    All forms of dairy farming involve forcibly impregnating cows. This involves a person inserting his/her arm far into the cow’s rectum in order to position the uterus, and then forcing an instrument into her vagina.The restraining apparatus used is commonly called a “rape rack.” 

    If given the opportunity, a dairy cow and her calf would remain companions for life. The forced separation on factory farms causes cows and calves an incredible amount of pain and grief. 

    Once separated, the cows are then hooked up to milking machines, enslaved to produce milk for humans that was intended for their baby that was ripped away. And when they stop lactating, they’re impregnated again. The same vicious cycle continues until the cows can no longer produce milk. When they’re all dried up they’re sent to slaughter. 

    Male calves are useless for milk production. Dairy cows are a different breed of cattle from the ones raised for beef. Dairy cows, female and male, lack the musculature necessary to maximize profits for beef producers. About half of the female calves will become dairy cows, to replace their mothers. The other half of the females are useless to the dairy industry. Nearly all of the male calves and half of the female calves are taken from their mothers, to be turned into veal. 

    Calves raised for veal are forced to spend their short lives in individual crates that are no more than 30 inches wide and 72 inches long. These crates are designed to prohibit exercise and normal muscle growth in order to produce tender “gourmet” veal. The calves are fed a milk substitute that is purposely low in iron so that they will become anemic and their flesh will stay pale. After four months “living” in these conditions, they’re sent to the slaughterhouse. 

    It’s sad to think that this heinous industry is thriving because of society’s mass consumption of dairy products. #VegansofIG


    vegansofig:

Have you guys tried the app Buycott? I’m excited that there’s finally an app to help me keep track of all of the companies I stay away from.  Buycott helps you to organize your everyday consumer spending so that it reflects your principles.  When you use Buycott to scan a product, it will look up the product, determine what brand it belongs to, and figure out what company owns that brand (and who owns that company, ad infinitum). It will then cross-check the product owners against the companies and brands to tell you if the scanned product conflicts with one of your campaign commitments.  Campaigns include “Say No To Monsanto” “Avoid Koch Industries” “Equality For LGBTQ” and “Vegan and Cruelty Free.” There’s even a campaign to boycott companies that sell fur.  Now there are some people that feel it’s important to support larger corporations that attempt vegan-friendly products to support the booming market of alternatives to animal products. I personally prefer to support smaller independent companies. I find that their integrity and the quality of their products is much higher than any business owned by a big corporation.  Buycott is available on the iPhone and android. Have you tried the app? Do you find it helpful? #VegansofIG
http://instagram.com/p/aOonnqmia1/

    vegansofig:

    Have you guys tried the app Buycott? I’m excited that there’s finally an app to help me keep track of all of the companies I stay away from.

    Buycott helps you to organize your everyday consumer spending so that it reflects your principles. 

    When you use Buycott to scan a product, it will look up the product, determine what brand it belongs to, and figure out what company owns that brand (and who owns that company, ad infinitum). It will then cross-check the product owners against the companies and brands to tell you if the scanned product conflicts with one of your campaign commitments.

    Campaigns include “Say No To Monsanto” “Avoid Koch Industries” “Equality For LGBTQ” and “Vegan and Cruelty Free.” There’s even a campaign to boycott companies that sell fur.

    Now there are some people that feel it’s important to support larger corporations that attempt vegan-friendly products to support the booming market of alternatives to animal products. I personally prefer to support smaller independent companies. I find that their integrity and the quality of their products is much higher than any business owned by a big corporation.

    Buycott is available on the iPhone and android. Have you tried the app? Do you find it helpful? #VegansofIG

    http://instagram.com/p/aOonnqmia1/


    vegansofig:

Part three of Vegans of Instagram series on common animal ingredients in our food and products.
1⃣ Royal Jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of larvae and adult queens. It is collected from each individual queen cell (honeycomb) when the queen larvae are about four days old. Royal Jelly makes workers into queens. It is used as as a source of B vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.Most honey comes from full-time factory bee farmers. 
2⃣ Shellac (E904) is a coating or glaze derived from the hardened, resinous material secreted by the female Kerria Lacca Insect. Shellac is scraped from the bark of the trees where they live. Often they are heated until they die of heat exhaustion. 300,000 lac insects are killed for every kilogram (2.2 lbs.) Shellac may be found in a furniture polish and varnish, aluminum foil coating, paper coating, hairspray, shampoos, perfume, makeup, printing inks and paints, and much more. Shellac is often called “Confectioner’s glaze” in candy and donut glaze. 
3⃣ Tallow. Rendered beef or mutton fat. Industrial use of tallow can be just about any type of animal fat (e.g. cow, pig, deer). Tallow is in a variety of products from wax paper, crayons, margarines, paints, rubber, lubricants, candles, soaps, lipsticks, shaving creams, other cosmetics. Chemicals (e.g., PCB) can be in animal tallow. Tallow is sometimes known as “Stearic Acid.” **Some Tallow is vegetable sourced.**
4⃣ Whey. The watery serum that remains after most of the protein and fat have been removed from milk during the cheese-making process. Usually in cakes, cookies, candies, breads, and supplements. 
➡ The purpose of this series was to connect the animals and the cruelty behind the unknown, sneaky animal ingredients we encounter every day. You’re more likely to encounter these ingredients in processed foods. I will now begin working on a new series on #vegan ingredients, because there are A LOT of delicious #AnimalFree goodies in the world. #VegansofIG
Click HERE for Part One: Albumen- Isinglass
Click HERE for Part Two: Keratin-Rennet

    vegansofig:

    Part three of Vegans of Instagram series on common animal ingredients in our food and products.

    1⃣ Royal Jelly is a honey bee secretion that is used in the nutrition of larvae and adult queens. It is collected from each individual queen cell (honeycomb) when the queen larvae are about four days old. Royal Jelly makes workers into queens. It is used as as a source of B vitamins, minerals, and amino acids.Most honey comes from full-time factory bee farmers. 

    2⃣ Shellac (E904) is a coating or glaze derived from the hardened, resinous material secreted by the female Kerria Lacca Insect. Shellac is scraped from the bark of the trees where they live. Often they are heated until they die of heat exhaustion. 300,000 lac insects are killed for every kilogram (2.2 lbs.) Shellac may be found in a furniture polish and varnish, aluminum foil coating, paper coating, hairspray, shampoos, perfume, makeup, printing inks and paints, and much more. Shellac is often called “Confectioner’s glaze” in candy and donut glaze. 

    3⃣ Tallow. Rendered beef or mutton fat. Industrial use of tallow can be just about any type of animal fat (e.g. cow, pig, deer). Tallow is in a variety of products from wax paper, crayons, margarines, paints, rubber, lubricants, candles, soaps, lipsticks, shaving creams, other cosmetics. Chemicals (e.g., PCB) can be in animal tallow. Tallow is sometimes known as “Stearic Acid.” **Some Tallow is vegetable sourced.**

    4⃣ Whey. The watery serum that remains after most of the protein and fat have been removed from milk during the cheese-making process. Usually in cakes, cookies, candies, breads, and supplements. 

    ➡ The purpose of this series was to connect the animals and the cruelty behind the unknown, sneaky animal ingredients we encounter every day. You’re more likely to encounter these ingredients in processed foods. I will now begin working on a new series on #vegan ingredients, because there are A LOT of delicious #AnimalFree goodies in the world. #VegansofIG

    Click HERE for Part One: Albumen- Isinglass

    Click HERE for Part Two: Keratin-Rennet


    vegansofig:

Part two of our series on common animal ingredients in our food and products. In their natural form, these ingredients are #NotVegan or #NotVegetarian. Vegan or Vegetarian alternatives are typically synthetic.  1⃣ Keratin: Natural Keratin is an extremely strong protein that is a major component in skin, hair, nails, feathers, hooves, horns, and teeth. Used in hair rinses, shampoos, and permanent wave solutions. Keratin is not naturally found in vegetables. Vegan keratin products might contain the amino acids necessary to produce keratin naturally. 2⃣ L-cysteine/L-cystine (E920) Animal: (Poultry. Typically duck feathers) Hog’s hair as a source is likely when the hair/feather supply is low. Used as a dough conditioner in most bread products. It is most common in pizza dough and bagels. Einstein Bros, Dunkin Donuts, Pizza Hut, and McDonalds have all confirmed the use of poultry feather-based L. Cysteine in many of their other products. 3⃣ Lanolin. (Wool Fat. Wool Wax) A product of the oil glands of sheep, extracted from their wool. Used as an emollient in many skin-care products and cosmetics and in medicines. Most chewing gums list “gum base” as one of their ingredients, masking lanolin as an ingredient. The starting material used to produce this vitamin D3 is Lanolin. 4⃣ Pepsin. In cow and hogs’ stomachs. A clotting agent used in some cheeses and vitamins. Pepsin is a component of rennet (see below) used to curdle milk during the manufacture of cheese. 5⃣ Rennet [Rennin] Enzyme from the stomach of slaughtered newly-born calves. Used in cheesemaking, rennet custard (junket), and in many coagulated dairy products. The coagulation of milk is achieved by the addition of rennet. Most cheeses (especially Parmesan, Grana Padano, and Gorgonzola are NOT vegetarian.
➡ Up next: Part Three (R-W) #VegansofIG
Click HERE for Part One: Albumen-Isinglass
Click HERE for Part Three: Royal Jelly-Whey

    vegansofig:

    Part two of our series on common animal ingredients in our food and products. In their natural form, these ingredients are #NotVegan or #NotVegetarian. Vegan or Vegetarian alternatives are typically synthetic.

    1⃣ Keratin: Natural Keratin is an extremely strong protein that is a major component in skin, hair, nails, feathers, hooves, horns, and teeth. Used in hair rinses, shampoos, and permanent wave solutions. Keratin is not naturally found in vegetables. Vegan keratin products might contain the amino acids necessary to produce keratin naturally.

    2⃣ L-cysteine/L-cystine (E920) Animal: (Poultry. Typically duck feathers) Hog’s hair as a source is likely when the hair/feather supply is low. Used as a dough conditioner in most bread products. It is most common in pizza dough and bagels. Einstein Bros, Dunkin Donuts, Pizza Hut, and McDonalds have all confirmed the use of poultry feather-based L. Cysteine in many of their other products.

    3⃣ Lanolin. (Wool Fat. Wool Wax) A product of the oil glands of sheep, extracted from their wool. Used as an emollient in many skin-care products and cosmetics and in medicines. Most chewing gums list “gum base” as one of their ingredients, masking lanolin as an ingredient. The starting material used to produce this vitamin D3 is Lanolin.

    4⃣ Pepsin. In cow and hogs’ stomachs. A clotting agent used in some cheeses and vitamins. Pepsin is a component of rennet (see below) used to curdle milk during the manufacture of cheese.

    5⃣ Rennet [Rennin] Enzyme from the stomach of slaughtered newly-born calves. Used in cheesemaking, rennet custard (junket), and in many coagulated dairy products. The coagulation of milk is achieved by the addition of rennet. Most cheeses (especially Parmesan, Grana Padano, and Gorgonzola are NOT vegetarian.

    ➡ Up next: Part Three (R-W) #VegansofIG

    Click HERE for Part One: Albumen-Isinglass

    Click HERE for Part Three: Royal Jelly-Whey





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